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Thread: Andhra Vegetarian Cuisine(Teluginti sakahara Vantalu)

  1. #1
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    Andhra Vegetarian Cuisine(Teluginti sakahara Vantalu)

    Guys,

    I am motivated to start this thread now. Hope to contribute some traditional vegetarian recipes. Any more andhrites out there...please do contribute your might to this thread as time permits.

    Thanks,
    Minni

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  3. #2
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    Andhrites take pride in their generous use of chillies more than any other part of India. People say that once upon a time during famines nothing other than chilli peppers grew and they found a way to make a meal out of it too!
    There are several recipes that over generously use chillies. Traditionally there are several varieties of chillies grown and used as per their flavours.
    Andhrites are staunch believers in the use of hing, menthulu(methi seeds), and turmeric. So its a characteristic of most of their dishes. They learnt ways to tame the spiciness of mustard by combining it with their favourite chillies.

    Other thing Andhra is famous for is their spicy pickles/achar- Avakayalu. One would be amazed how important it is in Andhra for a meal to have several different avakayalu. So this is something that needs to be dealt in detail with as well.

    Another aspect for which Andhra is famous is its wide variety of podulu- powders.

    I can summarise that Andhrite cuisine is proud of its use of Gongura, vankaya(brinjal/eggplant/aubergine), avakaya, pappu pulusu.

    I shall try my best to contribute as many recipes as I can...but please do pardon my slack times in between.

    Thanks,
    Minni

  4. #3
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    If a hostess makes gutti vankaya kura for the guests...then Andhrites consider that the guests are being treated royal by their hosts.
    Such is the fame of this "Gutti Vankaya Kura".

    Well, what does is mean anyways ?
    Gutti means a Bunch. Vankaya means brinjal/eggplant/aubergine.

    Why is it called Gutti Vankaya ?
    The small purple eggplants are slit into quarters such that they are still attached to their todima..ie., stem(like a bunch hanging from the stem). And the quarters are stuffed with various kinds of 'kooru'(stuffing powder/masala).
    The tender the eggplants are, the tastier the end result is.

    How do you select the right eggplants ?
    Many of you might already know how...but for those of you wondering how...the eggplants should look shiny without any blemishes, or holes and the stem that they are attached to should be in lively green without having that "dried" look.

    Ok, now, the important things to keep in mind about vankaya(eggplant/augergine/brinjal) in general are:

    You should cut it into a pot with water. This avoids browning and there by retains the original qualities of the vankaya.
    Secondly, the tempering with oil is important for retaining the outer texture of the eggplant.
    Finally, Salt should be added at the beginning of the cooking process itself.

    Should you take care of these three, your end product is likely to be well made, texturewise and tastewise.

    Okay there are several ways to make the stuffing. The stuffing varies by its ingredients.

    The proportions of the ingredients are not specified because there are no hard and fast rules and people at home add a little of this, little of that. So feel free to try various proportions as per your tastes.

    Stuffing variety 1:
    Coriander seeds(Dhaniyalu)
    Chana dal(Senaga pappu)
    Dried Red Chillies(endu mirapa kayalu)
    Turmeric
    Salt
    Tamarind extract
    Jeera(Jeelakarra)
    Methi seeds, 4-5(Menthulu)
    Word of caution:Methi is bitter. So a few seeds go a long way, so you may not need more than 4 seeds if cooking for two.
    Hing(inguva) a pinch.

    Using less oill helps grind to a powder, which otherwise might result in a hard to grind wet paste.
    In very little oil(just enough to coat the seeds), roast Coriander seeds(Dhaniyalu), Chana dal(Senaga pappu), Dried Red Chillies(endu mirapa kayalu).
    Then add the Jeera, methi seeds and hing. Let them roast for half a minute or so and then dry grind. To this add tamarind juice/extract, salt and turmeric to make it just a little wet but not a paste.
    Now stuff this into the eggplants and fry them in a skillet with decent amount of oil. By decent amount I mean till the eggplants are half full.
    This is the traditional way to make it. But I do bake it, by spraying them with cooking oil spray for health reasons.

    Stuffing variety 2:
    Dried Red chillies,
    Chana dal,
    Urad dal(mina pappu),
    Jeera,
    Methi seeds,
    Hing,
    Turmeric,
    Salt,
    Tamarind extract

    Method same as above.

    Stuffing variety 3:
    Roasted Til Powde(nuvvulapindi)
    Red chilli powder

    Salt

    Stuffing variety 4:
    Peanuts, roasted, powdered
    Jeera, roasted, powdered
    Red chilli powder
    Salt

    Stuffing variety 5:
    Fresh grated coconut/dried grated coconut
    Jeera, roasted powdered
    Red chilli powder
    Salt

    Stuffing variety 6:
    Besan(gram flour/senaga pindi)
    Jeera, roasted, powdered
    Red chilli powder
    Salt

    Mix the above with one tbsp oil and stuff the eggplants with this.
    Optionally you can add some fresh/dried grated coconut to this stuffing.

    Stuffing variety 7menthi vankaya) Another Popular stuffing.
    Dried red chillies
    Urad dal
    Methi seeds
    Jeera
    Salt
    Turmeric
    Tamarind extract.

    Stuffing variety 8:
    Green chillies
    Coriander leaves bunch/cilantro bunch
    Salt

  5. #4
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    Gongura Pachhadi

    For Andhrites, Pachhadi is a very important accompaniement for their meals. People take pride in the number of pachhadi's served in a meal. Anyways, I shall post a couple today.
    When new vegetables like cabbage and tomato started entering the market they made use of their knowledge to use them also.
    They happen to be my favourites too!

    But talking about traditional pachhadlu, I have to post the recipe for gongura pachhadi...andhrite's pride. Though many of us in US do not have the luxury to get this green leafy veggie, here you go with the recipe.

    After you clean the leaves(use a dry towel if possible), in couple table spoons of oil, you need to thoroughly cook it till it forms a thick mass.
    Let it cool in an open plate. Add a little salt and turmeric. If you wish to make it such that it lasts a year, you need to let it rest in a clean jar for couple days turning it with a spoon once a day. Else, you can temper with green chillies/(red chillies if you intend to store it for long), methi seeds, mustard seeds.Cool it. Grind this tempered ingredients before adding it to the gongura. Mix well.

  6. #5
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    How can I avoid the element chilli highlighted recipes ?

    Here you go with them

    Kottimeera Karam
    (Hot Cilantro/coriander leaves Chutney)

    I should admit, this is really tough gathering those individual tender leaves after cleaning the bunch. A couple bunches would yield only a couple handfuls or less of the final result. But on the brighter side, people go gaga over it. Anytime I make it, some guest at home would take my left overs of this. I hate to give it away after all the hard work, but I guess its equally treasured at the other end. I hope someday I can make enough for myself and not serve it for my guests! I know I cannot do it...but its just a hope!

    Anyways, thats an unnecessary introduction, but here you go with the recipe.

    As I already said, need like couple bunches of cilantro, cleaned and dried(in sense that the wetness from the water washed in should be gone). Ideally speaking, if you can...just clean it with a dry towel. Any water left would reduce the life of this pachhadi, so...beware of this fact.

    The procedure is very simple. Just roast few green chillies(again cleaned and dried) in couple tablespoons of oil till they are cooked thoroughly, then add the coriander leaves, fry for couple minutes and then cool them in an open plate. After its totaly cooled, add salt, turmeric, dry tamarind(NOT TAMARIND EXTRACT OR JUICE) and grind it.
    Voila!
    I know I know...its not voila! Its "finally" done!
    One of the simplest recipes, but effort and time taking recipes!

    If carefully handled this can last more than couple months.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Regular Hubber rsankar's Avatar
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    Hello Minni,

    It's good to see the another new thread.

    keep up your good work.

    rsankar.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Regular Hubber rsankar's Avatar
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    Hello Minni,

    Could you tell me, what is gongura in tamil?

    thanks.

  9. #8
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    Hi rshankar,

    Gongura is 'pulichha keerai' in tamil.

    Sangeetha

  10. #9
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    Hi Minni,

    I was waiting for someone to start thread for andhra recipes. And a great start with Kutti Vankaya...Am waiting to try these.....

    Anitha

  11. #10
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    Good job, Minni..

    My SIL was born & brought up in Cuddapah. She used to make erakaaram (dosa's topping) which is so yummy. Though have her recipe with me, the taste wont be the same when I make. Do u have any idea?

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