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Thread: Sir Sachin Tendulkar 4

  1. #21
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    Part 4 for the never ending parts of Sir Sachin Tendulkar

    This came as a forward.. this is just to tickle our humor bone and doesnt require to go emotional and start debating.. Remember this is being posted by one frigging hardcore fan of Sach !


    ---------------------------------------
    With Appraisal just over here is something to laugh about )

    Even Sachin is not spared in the Appraisal process.



    200 Runs/ 147Balls/ 25X4 / 3X6



    Agree you have done GREAT BUT BUT BUT BUT


    25 x 4s = 100
    3 x 6s = 18

    IT implies that you have done 118 Runs in 28 Balls.

    And 12 x 2s = 24
    58 x 1s = 58

    IT means you have done all 200 Runs in only 98 balls

    So you have wasted 147-98 = 49 balls

    Considering only 1 run scored on each of these balls you could have earned 49 valuable RUNS FOR OUR TEAM

    MANAGERíS COMMENT: So you only met the expectations and NOT EXCEEDING (though anyone of our team could not do it) and your Grade is C

    Trainings for him: Learn from how to STEAL singles.
    One Addition:

    Itís good that you played all 50 overs but you should encourage juniors in your team and let them showcase their talent to client Ė itís all @ team effort.

    Iím not saying you didnít perform well.. itís just a improvement area you can focusJJ

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalyasi
    "Better than Brian Lara and Ricky Ponting, the other two great players of my era. Better than Sir Viv Richards, Sunil Gavaskar and Allan Border. And I would even say better than Sir Don Bradman himself."
    Nasser Hussain runs out of comparables for Tendulkar

    Hussaiukku Santhome beach la selai vaingappa
    The only sensible commentator in the Sky team here and he has always been spot on in his commentatory.. Never ever over exaggerated even his own team members. His commentatory is as honest as his words in his autobiography "Playing with Fire"

  4. #23
    Senior Member Senior Hubber karthik_sa2's Avatar
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    Funny 10 Reasons y i hate Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar
    1. He always plays a brilliant innings before my exam and hence doesnít let me study.
    2. Every time that I think of becoming an atheist, he gets into the nineties and I have no choice but to pray.
    3. Every time I take a resolution not to bite my nails, he gets into the nineties and I am left with no choice but to chew on my nails.
    4. He keeps all the records to himself.
    5. He makes a lot more money than me.
    6. He costs way too much on Ďsuper selectorí but since I have to pick him, the rest of my team gets weakened.
    7. During a match, invariably when I want to go to the bathroom, he hits a boundary and hence I have no choice but to sit and watch the replay.
    8. As soon as I convince myself that God does not exist, he plays a straight drive and proves me wrong.
    9. He brings the whole country to a standstill whenever he bats
    10. And the last and the biggest reason why I hate Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar Ö

    He is going to retire sometime in the futureÖ

  5. #24
    Senior Member Senior Hubber karthik_sa2's Avatar
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    this was written by one guy in orkut... i loved it...

  6. #25
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    Harsha on Sachin from a different view...

    http://www.cricinfo.com/magazine/con...ry/449959.html

    Sachin Tendulkar sugar-coated the recent reality of India and gave its people something to cheer about. It is not easy to possess the mandate to lift the spirits of such a large nation, but he has done that consistently. The comparison with Sir Donald Bradman is not restricted to his batting alone. Like the great man who brought cheer to post-war Australia, Tendulkar allowed India to momentarily forget fires and bombs and inflation and terrorist threats. It was like that with the century he made after England so graciously agreed to tour after the 26/11 attacks in Mumbai. It has been like that for a long time. For better or worse cricket is more than a sport in India; Tendulkar is more than just a cricketer. Where our elected representatives callously fritter away the mandate people give them, Tendulkar has stayed true to it.

    And he has never forgotten why he started playing the game in the first place. The best have lofty ambitions when they begin but soon commerce, like a tenacious worm, gnaws into them. Fame surrounds them and prevents the fresh air of reason from breaking through. They acquire sycophants, that great curse of success. Playing the game becomes a means to a seemingly superior, but in reality hollower, end. Tendulkar has kept those demons at bay. He has made more money than anyone else in the game, acquired greater fame than is imaginable, but you could never guess that from the way he plays his cricket. He remains the servant, pursues the game with purity. Through the last decade India have been well-served by like-minded giants.

    And he works as hard as anybody has. Lance Armstrong once said that he wins the Tour de France not when he is cycling down the Champs Elysees but when he is out in the mountains facing icy winds while others are cosying in their blankets for an extra hour. Two years ago Tendulkar realised that his future lay in the way his body coped; that eventually his body rather than a bowler would get him. During the first IPL, as he struggled with a groin injury, he admitted that he found continuous rehab very difficult to live with. Once fit, he was like the child again, able to do what he wanted without worrying about whether his body was accomplice or traitor. And so he trained harder and rested well. You could see the effect as he scampered between wickets. Tendulkar's delightful second wind is the result of what you and I have not seen: hours in the gym and in training.




    The best have lofty ambitions when they begin but soon commerce, like a tenacious worm, gnaws into them. Fame surrounds them and prevents the fresh air of reason from breaking through. They acquire sycophants, that great curse of success

    As a result, Tendulkar's endgame is nowhere in sight. He is peeling off centuries like he did in his prime. The old air of predictability is still around; he is grinding his way through when needed, clobbering the ball when required. In this extraordinary long-distance race he is running, this looks like a mid-race burst rather than the finishing kick his age suggests it should be.

    So why has no one else scored a double-century in limited-overs cricket so far? Well, because it is very difficult for a start. Assuming 300 balls, you should expect to get no more than 150, which means you need to bat at a strike-rate of 133. You need to be mentally alert, because one casual shot, one moment of disrespect, could be your undoing. But, let's admit, the combination of pitches, outfields and boundary ropes has rarely tilted the balance so much in the batsman's favour. In Gwalior the groundsman told one half of the class they were not wanted. The bowlers were the extras in a movie, seeking, at best, a talking part. The stage had been prepared for Tendulkar but he still had to deliver an unforgettable performance.

    Inevitably the question will be asked: what next? I know there is only one thing he genuinely covets, and that is not in his hands. In 12 months Tendulkar hopes to play his sixth and last World Cup. So far his relationship with the World Cup has been like that of a child who scurries to the rossogulla shop only to find it shut every time. If he was a golfer seeking a Masters win or a tennis player hoping to win another Grand Slam, he could plan for it but he doesn't hold the key to a win in a team sport. It must happen, he cannot make it happen. But what else? Frankly, I don't care.

    Tendulkar's journey is about joy and purity and a landmark is merely a comfort stop.

  7. #26
    Moderator Diamond Hubber littlemaster1982's Avatar
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    Terrific Tendulkar

    There are many truly wondrous things about Sachin Tendulkar breaking the world record for the highest one-day score and becoming the format’s first double centurion, in effect cracking one of cricket’s many four-minute miles. He is months away from turning 37 and he batted through 50 overs.


    He has now been in the game for over 20 years. He did it not against minnows but a top side and the best fast bowler today. And for years he has looked the most likely to do it. But above all was the simplicity with which he greeted his feat: arms raised, a smile, and a peek up to the great beyond. No leaps, no fist-punches or extravagance, only humility. It has been the leitmotif of one of sport’s greatest, most significant careers, for the most remarkable thing about Tendulkar is that he is still Tendulkar 20 years on.

    He remains as committed and devoted to the sole idea of scoring runs and winning matches as any teenager taking his first steps in the game. The game today is not the same he came into. For one, greater riches are now available. Tendulkar is part of the reason for this abundance and is its beneficiary as well. Countless other distractions offer themselves. But he remains the same, the focus, priority and hunger untouched and untainted, his skills undimmed.

    All cricketers, but particularly some on this side of the border, would do well to learn from that. Swiss watchmakers might have struggled to create a more consistent, longer-lasting and elegant model. In all likelihood there will be more double hundreds now that Twenty20 has further liberated batsmen — not that they needed it. But few will come from a man such as Tendulkar. We have been fortunate in the subcontinent to have Little Masters aplenty, in Hanif Mohammad and Sunil Gavaskar. But Tendulkar is the biggest of them all. Remember him and appreciate him, for there may never be another like him.

  8. #27
    Senior Member Veteran Hubber 19thmay's Avatar
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    LM - What a siggy!

  9. #28
    Moderator Diamond Hubber littlemaster1982's Avatar
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    Sridhar. Sondha karutthu illa, suttadhudhan

  10. #29
    Moderator Diamond Hubber littlemaster1982's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [url=http://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=358527706534&id=138426460 696
    Brian Lara[/url]]Every innings played by Sachin Tendulkar is special, and it was his ultimate innings. No one but Sachin deserved to reach the 200-run landmark. We can see him only rise. Go on my friend

  11. #30
    Senior Member Veteran Hubber 19thmay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by littlemaster1982
    Quote Originally Posted by [url=http://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=358527706534&id=138426460 696
    Brian Lara[/url]]Every innings played by Sachin Tendulkar is special, and it was his ultimate innings. No one but Sachin deserved to reach the 200-run landmark. We can see him only rise. Go on my friend

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