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Thread: Amateur Etymology

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    Senior Member Veteran Hubber Querida's Avatar
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    Amateur Etymology

    Inspired by our hubber F.S. Ghandi i would like to start a thread on word origins (Etymology) anyone is welcome to contribute...I am specially interested in phrases and slang use:

    Bizarre
    was borrowed into English from French meaning handsome or brave, which in turn took the word from the Italian bizarro, meaning angry. When it jumped the channel, it shifted radically in meaning to its current sense. It first appears in English in 1648.

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    Moderator Veteran Hubber Badri's Avatar
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    Good initiative, Querida!

    The word Punch actually comes from our own Indian "Panch" as it has five ingredients, when properly made!!! (According to the Concise Oxford Dictionary)
    When we stop labouring under the delusion of our cosmic self-importance, we are free of hindrance, fear, worry and attachment. We are liberated!!!

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    Senior Member Senior Hubber nirosha sen's Avatar
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    Hmm..good one, Q!

    Okay, how abt Bungalow???? Comes from the Hindi word, Banglae!

    Or even juggernaut - from Jagarnath's chariot!!
    Demand a broader view - BBC

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    Senior Member Veteran Hubber Querida's Avatar
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    wow that's really interesting..

    well here's some ammo for those wanting to bash marriage: :P

    Honeymoon: "The word first appears in the 16th century. The honey is a reference to the sweetness of a new marriage. And the moon is not a reference to the lunar-based month, but rather a bitter acknowledgement that this sweetness, like a full moon, would quickly fade."

    Colonel: is originally Italian, a colonel being the commander of a military column or in Italian colonna. The French adopted the military rank, and in so doing switched the L for R (L/R switches are a common pronunciation shift).

    English adopted the French word, with an R spelling coronell in the mid-16th century. Starting in the late-16th century, translations of Italian military treatises started using the etymologically correct L spelling, and by the mid-17th century, colonel was the accepted English spelling. But the R pronunciation was firmly established and did not change.

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    Moderator Veteran Hubber Badri's Avatar
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    Got a few bucks?

    Buck, the slang term for a dollar, is a clipped form of buckskin. On the American frontier, buckskins were often used as units of commerce. The term buck, meaning a unit of value, dates to at least 1748
    When we stop labouring under the delusion of our cosmic self-importance, we are free of hindrance, fear, worry and attachment. We are liberated!!!

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    Senior Member Veteran Hubber Querida's Avatar
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    S.O.S. - S.O.S. does not stand for Save Our Souls, Save Our Ship, Stop Other Signals, Sure Of Sinking, or any other phrase.

    S.O.S. was chosen as the universal distress signal by the International Radio Telegraph Convention of July 1908 because this combination of three dots followed by three dashes followed by three dots (...---...), was easy to send and easily recognized, especially since they were usually sent as a nine-character signal, which stood out against the background of three-character Morse Code letters. The letters themselves are meaningless.

    The first recorded mention of the false acronymic origin is in reference to the Titanic sinking of 1912, which may account for its wide spread and endurance

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    Senior Member Senior Hubber nirosha sen's Avatar
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    amuck from Malay word amok which is running berserk!!
    Demand a broader view - BBC

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    Bangalow is from Tamil ‘Venkalavu’ which means ‘a place of No heat, usually a top place’

    Venka + u = Venka - Venkaatha is negative word for venkam. U – suttu oli. Venkam means ‘heat’ that is ‘veppam’

    Readers can observe This ‘Va’ is turning ‘Ba’ when you go from south to north of India just like ‘Vali’ is turned as ‘bali’ in Ramayana since no alphabet for ‘Va’ in north Indian languages.

    Bangalore was called ‘Venkaaloor” previously which is somewhat height in location and low in heat.

    Venkaa Idam = venkidam = Thirupathi mountain which is also low in heat.

    Hence if a house has upstairs it is called Bangalow.

    Take phrases of Latin origin in English. i.e., & e.g - That is & For example

    The expansion will be id est & exempli gratia.

    Compare the words with tamil. Athavathu – adavadu

    Id –ad , ‘s’ is due to pronounciation difference. et - vad

    ‘Esaivul kaattaka’ – rhymes with exempli gratia which means for example.

    Esai – esaivul means ‘similar’ and kaattaka means example.

    Tamil business with Greece were proved through tamil coins presence there.

    Likewise if we take up the extinct Latin and Greek we will find tamil presence.

    'Amuk' or 'Amok' might be from Tamil 'Amukkam' which means pressurized and thus someone run like a mad with fury.

    f.s.gandhi
    "Kal thonri man thontra kalathay mun thonri mootha kudi"- a second century literature- means when before stone became sand in earth the tamil tribes were formulated

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    The root for English word 'abnegate' is ab negare (Latin).

    ab - away , negare - to deny

    Compare the tamil word 'Nagaru' means 'go away or deny'. We find tamil root.
    "Kal thonri man thontra kalathay mun thonri mootha kudi"- a second century literature- means when before stone became sand in earth the tamil tribes were formulated

  11. #10
    Moderator Veteran Hubber Badri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by F.S.Gandhi vandayar

    Bangalore was called ‘Venkaaloor” previously which is somewhat height in location and low in heat.
    f.s.gandhi
    When at school in Bangalore, remembering studying about Kempegowda and his eating Bende Kaalu (baked beans) and how when he founded the city he called it bendekaalooru...



    After all, Kempegowda was the founder of Bangalore, and he'd have a say in naming it!!
    When we stop labouring under the delusion of our cosmic self-importance, we are free of hindrance, fear, worry and attachment. We are liberated!!!

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